Roof Rats

Color: Black
Legs: 4
Shape: Long
Size: 16″ total (6-8″ body plus 6-8″ tail)
Antennae: False
Region: Found throughout U.S.

Roof rats get their name from their tendency to be found in the upper parts of buildings. Ranging in size from 6 to 8 inches in length, not including their tails, they have very poor vision and are color blind. They do have extremely strong senses of hearing, smell, touch and taste.

Habits

Roof rats are known for the damage they cause by chewing on materials and eating stored foods.

Habitat

Roof rats can be found in the upper parts of buildings, and can also be found under, in and around structures. They only need a space of one-half inch to get into buildings.

Threats

Roof rats secured their place in history by spreading the highly dangerous bubonic plague. They support many ectoparasites and urinate on food.

Prevention:

To prevent rats from entering a home, seal up any holes or cracks larger than a quarter. Remove sources of moisture and harborage.

 

http://www.pestworld.org/roof-rat

Varied Carpet Beetles

Description
Varied carpet beetles get their name from the rainbow of color on their back surfaces.
Color: Black centers, with white, brown and yellow patches in an irregular arrangement Shape: Round, Size: 1/16 inches, Legs: Six, Antenna: Yes, & Flying: Yes.
Habits
These pests enjoy dining on carpets, woolen fabrics, dead insects, furs, hides, feathers, horns, hair, silk and bones. It can take 249-354 days to three years for varied carpet beetles to grow from an egg to an adult.
Habitat
Varied carpet beetles are found in homes in attics, Oriental carpets, tapestries and wood-based wall-to-wall carpeting.
Threats
Varied carpet beetles feed on dead insects, but also feed on upholstery and carpet, so they can damage those materials. They can also damage clothing fabric.
Prevention
As with moths, to avoid varied carpet beetle infestations, store clothing in plastic containers. Dry clean clothing thoroughly before storing for long periods of time.

Wildlife Prevention Tips

Raccoons, Bats, Skunks and Other Wildlife Oh My!

During fall and winter months, many homeowners are typically on the lookout for rodents – the most common winter pest. However, nuisance wildlife such as raccoons, foxes, and skunks also actively seek out shelter in and around homes. As wild animals pose various health and property risks, the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) encourages homeowners to take steps to prevent wildlife from invading their homes during cooler seasons.

“Most homeowners don’t typically view wildlife in terms of traditional pest control, but they should. Wildlife plays an important role in nature, but wildlife in and around our homes is a threat,” noted Missy Henriksen vice president of public affairs for NPMA. “As urban areas experience an increase in populations of these animals, homeowners who are encountering these animals for the first time may not be fully prepared to deal with an intrusion.”

The health threats posed by wildlife are numerous. Birds often harbor diseases such as Lyme disease, West Nile virus and histoplasmosis, a respiratory disease often spread through bird droppings. Bats, raccoons and skunks are frequent carriers of rabies, which is potentially fatal if left untreated. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), wild animals accounted for 92 percent of reported cases of rabies in 2009, the latest data available, with raccoons topping the list.

Wildlife prevention tips for homeowners:

Keep trash in fully sealed containers
Fence off open areas
Cap chimneys
Trim overgrown shrubs and tree branches
If you encounter a wild animal on your property, do not attempt to remove it on your own; contact your local wildlife or pest professional to determine the best course of action

 

Source: http://www.pestworld.org/

Did You Know…….

A female house mouse can give birth to up to a dozen babies every three weeks. Imagine having as many as 150 babies a year!

 

Source: http://www.pestworld.org/

Springtails

Color: Black
Legs: 6
Shape: Segmented, oblong
Size: 1/16″
Antennae: True
Region: Found throughout U.S.

Certain species of springtails are referred to as “snow fleas” when found in winter, but they are not fleas at all. Springtails are found year round, but because of a special protein that acts like anti-freeze, this type of springtail is able to survive in cold winter temperatures. Springtails don’t have wings, instead they get around by jumping, using a unique catapult system. Their jumping is especially noticeable in winter when they are contrasted against white snow.

Habits

Springtails are very common around pools with nearby vegetation, around air conditioning condensate drain lines and other moist areas. In winter, snow fleas emerge on sunny days and gather in large numbers around bases of trees where snow has melted. Because of their small size, they look like flecks of pepper or ashes on the surface of the snow. Snow fleas feed on decaying plant matter.

Habitat

Snow fleas prefer damp soil, leaf mold, decaying logs and fungi.

Threats

Snow fleas do not cause any structural damage and should not be of concern to homeowners. In addition, snow fleas are not a threat to family pets as they are not a flea at all. Their sole diet consists of rotting plant food.

Prevention:

None

Source: http://www.pestworld.org/